• Sarah Ann Ridgway

Sarah Ann Ridgway

The First Baha'i in the North of England

Here is the story of a working class woman, a silk weaver, born in the middle of the 19th century into a family of cotton weavers, who embraced a religion little known in the West.

There were seven names carved into the front of the gravestone and eight into the back - fifteen people in the same grave in Agecroft Cemetery, Salford. One was a remarkable woman, the first Bahá’í in the north of England: Sarah Ann Ridgway.

Set against the backdrop of a world moving from an agrarian society to an industrial one, Sarah Ann’s story gives us a glimpse into the lives of ordinary working people, their households, factories and schools.

But there is a story within this story: the determined quest of one Bahá’í woman to unveil the life of another.

Here is the story of a working class woman, a silk weaver, born in the middle of the 19th century into a family of cotton weavers, who embraced a religion little known in the West.

There were seven names carved into the front of the gravestone and eight into the back - fifteen people in the same grave in Agecroft Cemetery, Salford. One was a remarkable woman, the first Bahá’í in the north of England: Sarah Ann Ridgway.

Set against the backdrop of a world moving from an agrarian society to an industrial one, Sarah Ann’s story gives us a glimpse into the lives of ordinary working people, their households, factories and schools.

But there is a story within this story: the determined quest of one Bahá’í woman to unveil the life of another.

Not distributed by Bahá'í Books UK; links to other retailers are provided below for your convenience.

  • Contributors:: Madeline Hellaby (Author)
  • Publisher: George Ronald
  • Language: English

The Bahá’í Faith in the United Kingdom

Early Western Believers

Bahá’í History: Overviews

1844-1853: Ministry of The Báb

1853-1892: Ministry of Bahá’u’lláh

1892-1921: Ministry of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá

1921-1957: Ministry of the Guardian

1957 onwards